Bipolar Disorder · Depression

Visions, Incisions, and Head on Collisions

By Patrick Ian Bennett

I go from counting cars to crashing cars.
I‘m from here. I’m from Mars.
Yes! I see the stars…
-But do the scars on her wrist, Pre-exist?
I Insist you make a list.
Tisk**
Wish for something else to happen.
As for my brain, How do I map it?
How do I connect the dots?
Because I’ve got a lot.
To crop the picture just pick a mixture
of chemicals, unlevel and full of unbalanced equations.
No persuasion, can change my mind.
Why don’t i just pick my own time.

 

Patrick Ian Bennett is someone I (Maggie) have been close friends with since elementary school, and because he hasn’t sent me a short bio even though I asked him for one three times, I am going to write what I want to about him. If he doesn’t send me a bio by the time this is scheduled to go up at 5:00 pm, then I’m posting this and not taking it back down. He is an extremely talented musician, a singer-songwriter at heart, and he once borrowed my guitar for three years. He worked at Dutch Wonderland and probably doesn’t want to be reminded of it. He once asked if he could borrow five dollars from me, disappeared for half an hour, and came back with two vintage typewriters, which are still in my garage in PA. Patrick is the reason I became interested in learning more about mental illness and advocacy, way back in middle school. We’ve had an at-times very tense relationship over the years, but he’s someone that is like a brother to me and that I will always love, no matter what stupid, dumbass shit he gets into or how pissed off it makes me. I had an awkward crush on him in tenth grade that I am not (read: very) ashamed of, for like a month and a half. He likes black labs and is good at board games.

 

As many as 56% of people being treated for bipolar disorder will attempt suicide at least once in their lives, with as many as 20% of individuals with BPD dying from suicide; it’s estimated that individuals with BPD are thirty times more likely to attempt suicide than people without mental illness. If you or a loved one are feeling suicidal, please reach out for help. You can call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 in the United States.

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